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RCI Wall of Achievement

Wall of Achievement

The RCI Wall of Achievement honours former staff and students of our School who have gone on to earn distinction in various fields of endeavour.  By awarding a place onto the Wall of Achievement, RCI proclaims that the achievements of these former Raiders will be an inspiration through the years to other students who will follow in their footsteps - guided by knowledge, and realizing excellence.

Nominate someone today at http://bit.ly/RCIWofAnomination 

for more information, please contact Adam Noack at noacka@rcdsb.on.ca

 

Inductees

Charlotte Whitton

 

Charlotte Whitton

INDUCTED 2007

After Charlotte graduated from Renfrew Collegiate Institute, she continued her education at Queen's University in Kingston in preparation for her political and social activist career.  Charlotte was elected as the Mayor of the City of Ottawa in 1951, becoming the first female mayor of a major city in Canada.  Her political career spanned over a decade with election wins in 1952, 1954, 1960, and 1962.  Charlotte was the Director and driving force behind the Canadian Council on Child Welfare (which later became the Canadian Welfare Council and the Canadian Council on Social Development).  She will be remembered as an advocate for women's equality in the workplace and in the political arena.  With Charlotte's accomplishments, she is the first inductee onto the RCI Wall of Achievement.

 

Dr Burwell 

Dr. George Burwell, Sr.

INDUCTED 2008

Dr. George Burwell was a student at Renfrew Collegiate Institute at age eleven before attending Queen's University for his undergraduate and medical studies.  After receiving his medical degree in 1915, Dr. Burwell served overseas with the Canadian Army Medical Corps in France, Macedonia, India and Germany.  For his service with the Shropshire Light Infantry and the Lancashire Fusiliers, he was awarded the Military Cross and Bar twice.  From here, Dr. Burwell completed post-graduate work in New York City and then returned to Renfrew to open an office where he practised medicine for more than fifty years.  His service in the Renfrew community was vast.  He served as the Renfrew and District Medical Officer of Health for over thirty years, served as the Renfrew Victoria Hospital Chief of Staff, was elected as a Renfrew Town Council Member, and is a charter member and past president of the Royal Canadian Legion, Renfrew Branch.

 

Dave Lorente

(Major) Dave Lorente

INDUCTED 2008

Major Dave Lorente's influence on the community of Renfrew reaches far beyond the walls of Renfrew Collegiate Institute.  His teaching career at RCI began in 1952 and continued for a span of over thirty years.  During his years on staff, Major Lorente was instrumental in establishing the Harpooner (yearbook) as a cultural icon with Raider country.  Moreover, he was a leading force with the RCI Cadet Corps and Rifle Team.  Major Lorente's passion and expertise led RCI to numerous provincial, national, and international championships.  Most notably, he was the coach of the 1966 Canadian Inter-School Rifle Champions, 1967 Canadian Centennial Rifle Champions, 1969 Canadian Rifle Association Champions and the 1970 Silver Medallists at the Commonwealth Rifle Championships.  Major Lorente is also the founder and chair of Home Children Canada which has been honoured by numerous provincial, national, and international organizations and governments. He is has also authored the foreword to the book The Golden Bridge:  Young Immigrant to Canada 1933-1939.

 

Martin Cybulski-Ross

Martin Cybulski-Ross

INDUCTED in 2010

Martin Cybulski-Ross is one of RCI's most celebrated War Veterans. His career with the Canadian Armed Forces was celebrated by winning the Distinguished Cross for his work with the Royal Canadian Air Force during the Second World War.  Martin flew Fighter Command's first Mosquito daylight penetration into the German Homeland on March 27,1944. Before his wartime heroics, Martin won a place on the National Rifle Team which competed at Bisley in the United Kingdom. 

 

Dr Ferguson

Dr. J.Y. Ferguson

INDUCTED in 2010

After attending RCI, James Young Ferguson studied at Queen's University gaining a B.A in 1902 and his Medical Doctorate in 1905. Upon graduation, Dr. Ferguson immediately volunteered as a foreign missionary and from 1905 to 1014 was a Presbyterian medical missionary in Formosa (Taiwan).  He was instrumental in the founding of the MacKay Memorial Hospital in Taipei.  Upon his return to Canada, Dr. Ferguson established a general practice in Toronto before being appointed Chief of Staff and Chief Surgeon for Toronto East General Hospital. After retiring as Chief in1947, he headed a world-wide survey of Medical Missions on behalf of the United Church of Canada. Dr. Ferguson continued practicing medicine up until his 89th birthday.  Dr. Ferguson is a Senior Life Member of the Toronto East Medical Association and was the recipient of the GM Grant Prize for Moral Excellence. 

 

Dr Armatage

Professor Kay Armatage

INDUCTED in 2014

 

After graduating from RCI in 1961, Kay Armatage studied English Literature at Queen's University and University of Toronto, graduating with a PhD in 1974. She then pursued a path of academic life as a tenured professor of Women's Studies and Cinema Studies at the University of Toronto. In fact, Armatage was instrumental in creating U of T's undergraduate program in Women's Studies, one of the first in Canada. Over her career,  Armatage authored and edited books and articles on women filmmakers, feminist theory, and Canadian Cinema. She also produced and directed documentary and experimental narrative films, for which she won prizes in international film festivals.The Arts and Services communities have also recognized Armatage for her career contributions, awarding her the Toronto Women in Film and Television Award of Merit in 1988 and 2004,  YWCA Woman of Distinction Award in 1989, and the Clyde Gilmour Award for enriching the understanding and appreciation of Canadian cinema in 2004. Armatage also served as an international programmer for the Toronto International Film Festival from 1983 to 2004 and was the founding Director of the University of Toronto's Graduate Collaborative Program in Women's Studies from 1994 to 2000.   Since retiring from U of T in 2011, she has been involved in activist research on women filmmakers and women's film festivals.

 

Professor Stacey Brydges

Professor Stacey Brydges

INDUCTED in 2015

 

Stacey Brydges graduated from RCI in 1991 with the distinction of Valedictorian before embarking on an exciting and fulfilling path to a career linking science and society. She earned a B.Sc. with Honours in Chemistry (and minor in Economics) in 1996, followed by a Ph.D. in Inorganic Chemistry in 2003 from McMaster University in Hamilton, ON, Canada. From 2004-2008, she held the position of lecturer and associate research scientist in the Department of Chemistry at Columbia University in the City of New York, USA. In 2008 she moved west to the University of California, San Diego (UCSD), where she is a tenured professor in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry. She has merged her professional interests in chemical research and education at the graduate, undergraduate, and pre-college levels by focusing on curriculum development, pedagogical reform, and K-21 programs, and by working with educators and administrators in Canada and the United States to advance access to, and retention in, education and careers in science, particularly for women and underrepresented minorities. Her most recent accolades include twoFaculty Appreciation Awardsfrom UCSD's Office of Academic Support & Instructional Services (2008-09; 2009-10), anOutstanding Professor Awardfrom UCSD's Panhellenic Council (2013), and a UCSDAcademic Senate Distinguished Teaching Award(2013-14). Fiercely proud of her RCI alumna status and Ottawa Valley roots, Professor Brydges continues to advance national and international efforts to raise science literacy.